Yes

Daniel De Beer, Opinions Editor: Online

With the help of modern-day technology, it has become substantially easier to hack, rig or cheat when casting a vote for U.S. presidential elections. For example, speculation of interference in the 2016 U.S. presidential election by Russian hackers aimed to boost President Donald Trump’s candidacy succeeded in causing political turmoil, which sowed distrust in the American democracy system. 

Thus, I am confident that implementing the requirement of voter identification in all states for future U.S. elections will result in a greater sense of political stability in the country and faith in the democratic system.

The U.S. government issues identification cards at no cost if an individual is a legal U.S. citizen. To remove the possibility of voter fraud, a non-photo or photo identification is required to vote in some U.S. states. Without an ID, individuals are rendered a second-class citizen in the U.S., and thus cannot board a plane, ride an Amtrak train, buy age-restricted items or even open a checking account. The process of obtaining an ID is required to ensure that only U.S. citizens can have access to these rights and privileges, especially when it comes to voting.

A measure as simple as voter ID can decrease several cases of voter fraud in the U.S., certifying every single vote in the election and preventing illegal voting.”

Nearing the end of the 2016 presidential election, after Trump narrowly lost to Clinton in New Hampshire, he accused people of busing from Massachusetts to New Hampshire and voting a second time against him. This caused many of his supporters to agree and form accusations of mass voter fraud in the U.S., causing political unrest and the question of the integrity of the democracy of the U.S.

Although the greater sense of democratic security is an advantage of voter identification, preventing voter fraud on the small scale can have a drastic change in the outcome of an election. There have been many cases of close elections in U.S. history, a prominent example being the 1880 presidential election of James A. Garfield versus Winfield Scott Hancock. Although it occurred a long time ago, the popular vote was extremely close, with Garfield managing to win by a mere popular 7,368 votes.

A measure as simple as voter ID can decrease several cases of voter fraud in the U.S., certifying every single vote in the election and preventing illegal voting. While these cases may be infinitesimal, voter ID provides broader insurance and effectively strengthens the democracy of the U.S. while diminishing accusations and conspiracies against the integrity and legitimacy of elections.

Ultimately, voter ID aids the backbone of the U.S. democracy in addition to securing each and every vote in an election. With the current polarized political state of the U.S., having a fair and reliable democracy can place the country on a path towards more agreeable solutions.